Tag Archives: science

Research papers accepted for publication

Two Skidaway Institute faculty had papers accepted for publication recently.

Dana Savidge:

“CASPER: Coupled Air-Sea Processes and Electromagnetic (EM) ducting Research”
Bulletin of Atmospheric Sciences Journal Article accepted (peer-reviewed) Nov. 3, 2017 (BAMS-D-16-0046)

Author List: Qing Wang; Denny P. Alappattu; Stephanie Billingsley; Byron Blomquist; Robert J. Burkholder; Adam J. Christman; Edward D. Creegan; Tony de Paolo; Daniel P. Eleuterio; Harindra Joseph S. Fernando; Kyle B. Franklin; Andrey A. Grachev; Tracy Haack; Thomas R. Hanley; Christopher M. Hocut; Teddy R. Holt; Katherine Horgan; Haflidi H. Jonsson; Robert A. Hale; John A. Kalogiros; Djamal Khelif; Laura S. Leo; Richard J. Lind; Iossif Lozovatsky; Jesus Panella-Morato; Swagato Mukherjee; Wendell A. Nuss; Jonathan Pozderac; L. Ted Rogers; Ivan Savelyev; Dana K. Savidge; R. Kipp Shearman; Lian Shen; Eric Terrill; A. Marcela Ulate; Qi Wang; R. Travis Wendt; Russell Wiss; Roy K. Woods; Luyao Xu; Ryan T. Yamaguchi; Caglar Yardim

Catherine Edwards:

“Detecting Abnormal Speed of Marine Robots Using Controlled Lagrangian Particle Tracking Methods”
IEEE Proc. Workshop on Underwater Networks (WUWNet) 2017, accepted Oct. 12, 2017.

Author List: S. Cho.*, F. Zhang, and Catherine Edwards

Advertisements

New grants to fund Skidaway Institute research

A series of new research grants will support UGA Skidaway Institute research projects for the coming years.

Julia Diaz is the lead scientist on a $852,906 three-year grant from the National Science Foundation titled “Collaborative Research: Assessing the role of compound specific phosphorus hydrolase transformations in the marine phosphorus cycle.” Julia and her colleague, Solange Duhamel from the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, will study how phytoplankton cope with shortages of phosphorus in the ocean, and if phytoplankton in phosphorus-rich environments also exhibit some of the same strategies. Skidaway Institute’s share of the grant is $296,831. The grant began on Sept. 1, 2017.

Cliff Buck has been approved for two new grants.

The first is a four-year, $350,412 award, beginning on January 1, 2018, from the NSF Arctic System Science Program. Cliff will work as part of an international team on the Multidisciplinary drifting Observatory for the Study of Arctic Climate (MOSAiC) program in the central Arctic Ocean. The team plans to lock an icebreaker into the Arctic ice cap for a year and use it as a base of operations to study a wide range of Arctic processes. Cliff’s specialty will be studying the atmospheric deposition of trace elements.

The second is a three-year grant, for $466,135 from the NSF Ocean Section – Chemical Oceanography. It is titled “US GEOTRACES PMT: Quantification of Atmospheric Deposition and Trace Element Fractional Solubility” and will focus on atmospheric deposition to the Pacific Ocean. The grant will fund participation in the planned U.S. GEOTRACES Pacific Meridional Transect (PMT) from Alaska to Tahiti scheduled for September – November 2018 which is the dusty period in the Gulf of Alaska.

Sasha Wagner, Aron Stubbins and Jay Brandes have received an NSF grant totaling $577,082 to study oceanic dissolved black carbon. The project is titled “Constraining the source of oceanic dissolved black carbon using compound-specific stable carbon isotopes.” The grant will begin on February 1, 2018 and run for three years.

Frischer black gill paper published

Marc Frischer recently had a new paper on black gill published in the Journal of Shellfish Research. Dick Lee, Tina Walters, Karri Bulski and Ashley Price were among his co-authors.

Frischer M.E., Lee R.F., Price A.R., Walters T.L., Bassette M.A., Verdiyev R., Torris M.C., Bulski K., Geer P.J., Powell S.A., Walker A.N. and Landers S.C. (2017). Causes, diagnostics and distribution of an ongoing penaeid shrimp black gill epidemic in the South Atlantic Bight, USA. Journal of Shellfish Research. 36: 487-500. doi: 10.2983/035.036.0220

Sydney Plummer awarded NSF fellowship

Sydney Plummer has been awarded an NSF graduate fellowship to investigate the ecophysiological roles of phytoplankton-derived reactive oxygen species.

Sydney is a Ph.D. student through the Integrated Life Sciences program at the University of Georgia. She is currently working in Julia Diaz’s lab. Her project involves studying superoxide production by phytoplankton in the presence of grazing predator species. Her hobbies include reading, camping, and going on adventures.

The fellowship of the National Science Foundation will allow her to advance the current understanding of factors that underlie the structure and productivity of marine microbial communities, coupled biogeochemical cycles of carbon, nutrients, and metals, and thereby provide implications for marine ecosystem health and climate.

Julia Diaz, her doctoral advisor, says “Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are typically considered toxic chemicals that are harmful to life. I am excited that Sydney’s PhD research will challenge this paradigm by investigating the possible beneficial roles of ROS in phytoplankton, such as growth promotion and defense against zooplankton grazers.”

Skidaway scientists head to Norway for phytoplankton research

A team of UGA Skidaway Institute scientists, led by Elizabeth Harvey, will be spending the next few weeks at a sophisticated mesocosm facility near Bergen, Norway. The team will be at will be at the station to study the interaction of the globally important phytoplankton Emiliania huxleyi (E. hux) with the viruses that infect and kill E. hux cells. You can follow along with the team and their international collaborators through their blog.

https://fjordphytoplankton.wordpress.com/

Gray’s Reef hosts MATE ROV competition

by Michelle Riley
Gray’s Reef NMS

Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary recently hosted their annual Southeast regional Marine Advanced Technology Education (MATE) Remotely Operated Vehicle (ROV) competition. Spearheaded by GRNMS’s Volunteer and Events Coordinator Jody Patterson, staff and volunteers from the sanctuary as well as Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary Foundation welcomed sixteen teams of students who came to compete for first place and a shot to compete in the national MATE competition.

Wolfpack Robotics Team from North Paulding High School competing, first place winners. Photo Credit: Michelle Riley

The competition is open to young scientists from K-12 to university level students and challenges them to create innovative solutions to real-world situations that are dealt with by NOAA and other marine industries. This year’s theme was Port Cities of the Future, which prompted students to use their underwater robots to perform tasks that could be utilized to clean and maintain the waters of port cities. MATE encourages students to develop their entrepreneurial skills by creating a business plan that supports their innovative marine technology as well as marketing materials that showcase their work. Students choose from four classes of competition in which they can present their marketing materials and demonstrate their robots.

Vying for a spot at the international competition was the eight-time champion team InnovOcean from Carrollton High School as well as five other teams in the ranger class. Although the competition was fierce all day, in the end, first place fell to the Wolfpack Robotic Team from North Paulding High School in Dallas, Ga. Gray’s Reef congratulates all the teams that competed in the Southeast regional competition and will be cheering on the Wolfpack Robotic Team in June as they compete in the international competition in Long Beach, Calf.

 

Savannah Science Seminar @ Skidaway

A group of approximately 35 local high school students visited UGA Skidaway Institute on the evening of Monday, March 27, to get a close-up look at some Skidaway research. The students were participants in the Savannah Science Seminar, a nine-month-long program designed to promote an understanding and appreciation for science through informative, participatory presentations and hands-on workshops in the fields of engineering, technology, mathematics and the medical practices.

Julia Diaz organized the evening’s program. After an introductory talk by Jim Sanders, the students were split into three groups that rotated among three science stations.

Catherine Edwards explained the workings of autonomous underwater vehicles.

Patrick Duffy and Sean Anderson demonstrated the workings of the new LIME imaging lab.

Julia Diaz and Sydney Plummer discussed eutrophication and phytoplankton blooms.