Tag Archives: noaa

Sarah Fangman moves to Florida Keys NMS

By Michele Riley
Gray’s Reef recently announced that NOAA’s Office of National Marine Sanctuaries has selected Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary superintendent, Sarah Fangman, as the new superintendent for its sister sanctuary, Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. Sarah has been a dear member of the Gray’s Reef family and will be an effective leader for the Keys. She has been with the Office of National Marine Sanctuaries since 1998. Sarah moved to Savannah in 2005 to serve as the program coordinator for the sanctuary system’s Southeast, Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean region, and worked in the Florida Keys extensively before becoming the superintendent of Gray’s Reef in 2014.

Gray’s Reef remains in good hands as Aria Remondi, on temporary assignment from NOAA Headquarters, is serving as acting superintendent at Gray’s Reef until September. Following, in the fall will be George Sedberry, also in an acting capacity. George is the science coordinator for the sanctuary system’s Southeast, Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean region and is based here on campus. Many readers might already know George, since he previously served as Gray’s Reef’s superintendent in the mid-2000s.

Two NOAA staffers honored

Two Skidaway Island-based NOAA staffers were recently recognized with prestigious awards from NOAA. Reed Bohne and Marybeth Head were presented the awards on May 23rd in Washington, D.C.

Bohne was awarded the NOAA Distinguished Career Award for “exceptional contributions to the management and growth of the National Marine Sanctuary and National Estuarine Research Reserve systems.” Bohne supervises six of the system’s 13 national marine sanctuaries, including Gray’s Reef.

NOAA Corps Ensign Head, who also serves as the Vessel Operations Coordinator at Gray’s Reef, received the NOAA Bronze Medal Award, the highest award granted by the Under Secretary of Commerce for Oceans and Atmosphere. Ensign Head was recognized for “rapid integration and deployment of Autonomous Surface Vessels for hydrographic use aboard the NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson.”

New faces on campus

Douglas Love is the newest face in Skidaway Institute’s plant operations. Douglas was born and raised in Savannah. After high School, he joined the navy, spending four years in uniform with two tours in the Persian Gulf. Douglas has been married for 17 years and he is an avid outdoorsman

Silvia Falco is an assistant professor at Universitat Politècnica de València, Spain. She will spend the next two months at Skidaway Institute collaborating with Cliff Buck as they study atmospheric inputs of elements to coastal ecosystems. Her research is on marine biogeochemistry with a focus on eutrophic processes in sediment and coastal and estuarine waters.

Cacinele Rocha is a Ph.D. student from Federal University of Rio Grande, southern Brazil, who also came to collaborate with Cliff Buck in the Trace Element Chemical Oceanography Lab. Cacinele’s major is submarine groundwater discharge with a focus on the geological deposition influence.

Kun Ma is a UGA doctoral student in Jay Brandes’s lab. Kun is from Inner Mongolia, China, and first came to the United States in 2006 for school. She completed her B.S. in biology at State University of New York Geneseo and a M.S. in ecology at Shippensburg University of Pennsylvania. Her master’s thesis is on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in karst springs. Kun is interested in biogeochemistry, particularly elemental cycling in the marine environment. She will be working with Jay and Aron Stubbins on carbon dioxide production from photochemical degradation of dissolved organic carbon for the next few years. Kun enjoys traveling and many outdoor activities like hiking, camping, backpacking, swimming and skiing. She likes to read and has a particular interest in ancient Chinese history.

Emily Noakes is an intern from UGA who will be splitting her time between Skidaway Institute and the UGA Aquarium. She is an Athens native. “The ocean has always been my home,” Emily said. “I have always been enthralled with the inhabitants of the ocean, and my father, (UGA associate research scientist) Scott Noakes, has been teaching me about the ways of the marine world from the time I could grasp a mollusk.”

Erin Siebert is an intern in Aron Stubbins’s lab. Erin is a senior at Alfred University in Alfred, N.Y, pursuing a double major in environmental studies and geology. She plays soccer for Alfred University. She is working on dissolved inorganic and organic carbon. Erin’s future goal is to attend graduate school and obtain a master’s degree in environmental science and policy with a concentration in water resources.

Quinton Diou-Cass is an intern in Liz Harvey’s lab. Quinton is a senior ecology major at Susquehanna University in Pennsylvania. He is originally from central Maine. After graduation, Quinton would like to pursue a master’s degree in marine ecology or biological oceanography and eventually continue on to a Ph.D. He is very interested in natural and anthropogenic changes in marine invertebrate ecology. “I believe that understanding, evaluating, and quantifying the ecological and environmental changes within the ocean’s ecosystems, as they relate to both natural and human impacts, is an exceedingly important field of research, and I aim to be a part of what should (and hopefully will) be a subject of increasing priority,” he said.

Doug Mollett is back for his second summer in Julia Diaz’s lab. He is a junior at Georgetown College in Kentucky. He is working on a double major in environmental science and Spanish. This summer he will be working on measuring polyphosphate degradation in local waters.

New faces on campus

Charlie Rice is Skidaway Institute’s new HVAC specialist, replacing  Neil Mizell, who recently retired from Skidaway Institute. He was  born and raised in Savannah. Charlie is married and has a nine year old son.

Skye Mills is a public relations and communications intern at Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary. She will graduate from Armstrong State University in May 2017 with a B.A. in English and professional communications. Skye is a native of the Savannah area.

“I enjoy my southern and coastal roots,” she said. “I spend as much time as I can in my kayak, strolling the beach, or immersing myself in Savannah’s rich history.

Skye says she wants to work for something that matters and makes a difference. “I wanted to work for a cause that I can get behind and at Gray’s Reef I really feel like I am accomplishing that.”

National award will allow more students to experience the Georgia coast

A $50,000 Hollings Award from the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation will pay for 850 fourth graders from Liberty and McIntosh counties to experience Georgia’s coastal environment and Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary during field trips to the UGA Marine Education Center and Aquarium on Skidaway Island.

Marine Extension associate director Anne Lindsay shows a corn snake to a group of students.

“We are extremely excited about this opportunity,” said Mark Risse, director of UGA Marine Extension and Georgia Sea Grant, which oversees the education center and aquarium. “Reaching these historically underserved communities with hands-on, field-oriented educational programs is often difficult due to transportation and economic issues. This funding will allow us to target our efforts just for them and provide free transportation and programs.”

In addition, the grant will allow UGA and Gray’s Reef to offer free programs on Georgia’s estuarine systems and offshore habitats at a school in each county, extending the education to students’ families.

“These communities are located in watersheds that impact the waters around Gray’s Reef. We hope that our efforts will influence the decisions they make and benefit the coastal ecosystems surrounding the sanctuary,” Risse said.

Enhancements to the Gray’s Reef exhibit at the UGA Aquarium are also included as part of the project. A new wall-mounted monitor and graphics will feature underwater video footage of the reef and provide information to aquarium visitors about the National Marine Sanctuary Program.

The award is one of five 2017 grants totaling $215,000 from the National Marine Sanctuary Foundation’s Hollings Awards, an annual program designed to expand public awareness of conservation issues.

Changes at Gray’s Reef

chris-hines-headshot-1-wChris Hines is the new Deputy Superintendent for State Programs at Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary. After joining Gray’s Reef as a volunteer in 2014, Chris served as the initial executive director of Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary Foundation and as the part-time Partnership Development Manager for the sanctuary. A NOAA diver, Chris has diverse experience in the public, private, and nonprofit sectors, including four years at a nonprofit in Tanzania, a State Department fellowship, and four years in the corporate sector. Originally hailing from California, Chris received his B.S. in Business from Purdue University and M.S. in International Public Service from DePaul University.

vicki-weeks-1-wVicki Weeks is the new executive director of the GRNMS Foundation.  Vicki graduated from Southern Illinois University with a degree in psychology. Shortly thereafter she began her love affair with the sea. She was the first female diver on Mel Fisher’s Treasure Salvors dive team in Key West, Fla. When her landlady tired of musket balls and pottery shards in lieu of rent, she became a SCUBA instructor, opened a dive shop and taught more than 400 people to dive.

Vicki went on to serve on the founding board of Reef Relief, a nonprofit organization that installed the first mooring buoys along the Florida Keys reef tract, as well as on the first advisory council for the Florida Keys Marine Sanctuary. She eventually became a nonprofit development consultant and served as the executive director for two healthcare organizations.

Since moving to Savannah, she has returned to her environmental roots, helping clients successfully build community support for environmental issues ranging from banning offshore drilling, to stronger EPA regulatory action on greenhouse gasses, to saving southern forests from clear-cutting by the wood pellet biofuels industry.

When not assisting environmental activists, she enjoys writing and has been published in regional and national magazines. Her first novel, Code of Honor, was released in 2015.

marybeth-head-1-wEnsign Marybeth Head is the new vessel operations coordinator at Gray’s Reef. She replaces Lieutenant Jared Halonen, who has been assigned to NOAA headquarters.

Marybeth was previously stationed aboard the NOAA Ship Thomas Jefferson, a hydrographic survey ship in Norfolk, Va.  She is a PADI divemaster and has her 50-ton USCG license. Prior to NOAA Corps, she worked as an assistant dive safety officer and as a charter boat deckhand. Marybeth grew up in Applegate, Ore. and graduated from Oregon State University where she earned a Bachelor of Science in Fisheries and Wildlife with a specialization in Marine Ecology.  She has been a big fan of sea critters for as long as she can remember!

 

Kimberly Roberson new research coordinator at Gray’s Reef

kim-roberson-wKimberly Roberson is the new research coordinator for Gray’s Reef National Marine Sanctuary.

Kimberly began working with NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science’s Biogeography Branch in 2005 and joined the Office of National Marine Sanctuaries in 2016. Kim received her bachelor of science degree from Berry College in Rome, Ga. She earned her master of science degree from Acadia University in Wolfville, Nova Scotia where she conducted research on leatherback sea turtles, using genetics to explore connectivity between nesting populations and pelagic individuals. Prior to NOAA, Kim worked with the National Park Service in St. Croix, USVI, conducting research and implementing conservation measures on endangered and threatened species.

Kim uses diving as a tool for research and has been a NOAA certified diver since 2005 and a NOAA divemaster since 2006. She served as the National Ocean Service Diving Officer for three years and chaired the NOAA Diving Control and Safety Board for two years. Her early NOAA work had her diving, conducting fish counts and assessing the potential research area boundaries of Gray’s Reef.

Kim is originally from Tennessee and developed a love for the ocean during family vacations to the coast. She enjoys spending time outside, running, swimming, playing and exploring with her husband and two young sons.